Trails, roadblocks and setbacks are natural byproducts of both professional and personal ventures. We all experience them, but it’s how we choose to react to those seasons of difficulty that warrant different results. When we’re sitting in the doldrums of discomfort, are we able to fully harness the benefits of perseverance? By actively choosing to press onward despite circumstances, we gain a richer self-awareness that allows us to tap into even greater productivity.

“We overestimate what we can accomplish in a day, but underestimate what we can accomplish in a year,” says popular entrepreneur and author Chris Guilleabeau. And it’s true: even the smallest steps of progress add up. In the midst of challenges, it’s the act of perseverance that unlocks a wealth of benefits.

In the book, Design Your Day by Claire Diaz-Ortiz, this idea is explored as she guides readers through brilliant tips and tricks to achieving more in less time. After all, there’s a reason Parkinson’s Law states “work expands so as to fill the time available for its completion.” You might be more familiar with the 80/20 rule: 80% of the work is done by 20% of the people or, your best 80% of work can be done in 20% of the time. And while we know it innately, we have a tendency to stretch out certain tasks, especially things like writing, brainstorming and deep-focus client work, long after the coffee’s gone cold.

In order to avoid that, tap into the benefits of perseverance with this productivity trick from Diaz-Ortiz by discovering the time of day you’re best at certain activities. Start with the following easy steps-

Step 1

Grab a piece of paper and- throughout a day, or even over the course of a week- jot down work and life tasks. Things such as:

  • Writing and answering emails
  • Brainstorming
  • Leading meetings
  • Taking calls
  • Giving presentations
  • Researching
  • Spending time with family and friends
  • Reading
  • Physical activity
  • Cleaning

Step 2

Now, work through the list and consider the time of day you feel most productive doing those particular tasks- when is it most natural in the day for you to persevere at a certain role? Really think about it. If an answer doesn’t come, consciously observe when you find yourself getting into “the zone” and contrarily, when you don’t tend to stick to a task.

Step 3

Reorder the list based on time of day, and slowly, but surely, work to structure your day around this new ideal.

It won’t be perfect. “Failure is only the opportunity to begin again, this time more intelligently,” said Henry Ford. If that’s true, it only makes sense to navigate difficult challenges steadfastly, by smartly streamlining perseverance to launch us into greater work.

While you’re navigating through your own challenges and roadblocks this week, consider how can you channel the benefits of perseverance. If you’re a Roam member, we’d love to continue this conversation on Network. Login, post your thoughts and join the conversation!

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